Possession of a Controlled Substance: What Are the Consequences?

Possession of a Controlled Substance

When you are facing charges for possession of a controlled substance in the state of Wyoming, it is important to keep in mind that Wyoming drug possession laws are very strict. 

If you are convicted of a drug possession charge, you are likely to face time in jail, as well as a monetary fine. 

Wyoming Drug Crimes Defense Attorney Helping with Possession Charges

The sentencing for a drug possession conviction depends on a number of different factors, including the amount of the drug in your possession, the type of drug, and whether the charges included possession with intent to manufacture or deliver a substance.

An experienced drug possession defense attorney in Wyoming can begin working on your case to help you avoid the consequences of a conviction.

Sentencing Penalties for a Wyoming Drug Possession Offense

It is unlawful to possess a controlled substance in Wyoming without a valid prescription for the drug. Even if a drug is lawful with a valid prescription, you can still face serious consequences if you are in possession of a controlled substance without a medical prescription from a healthcare provider.

Controlled substances in Wyoming are classified into one of the following categories: Schedule I, Schedule II, Schedule III, Schedule IV, and Schedule V.

Under Wyoming law (WY Stat. § 35-7-1031), the following are possible penalties for a drug possession conviction with a small amount of a controlled substance:

  • Possession of a small amount of a Schedule I, II, III, or IV controlled substance can result in a fine of up to $1,000, a jail term of up to one year, or both;
  • Subsequent offenses can result in a term of up to 5 years in prison, a monetary fine of up to $5,000, or both.

A small amount of a controlled substance is defined as:

  • Three ounces or less in plant form;
  • Three-tenths of a gram or less in liquid form;
  • Three grams or less in powder or crystalline form;
  • Three grams or less in pill or capsule form;
  • Less than five-tenths of a gram of crack cocaine; and
  • Less than three-tenths of a gram of LSD.

Possession of greater than the quantities listed above, but not including possession charges with intent to manufacture or deliver, can result in the following consequences:

  • Up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000 for possession of a Schedule I, II, or III controlled substance;
  • Up to 2 years in prison and a fine of up to $2,500 for possession of a Schedule IV controlled substance; and
  • Up to 1 year in jail and a fine of up to $1,000 for a Schedule V substance.

What is the Difference Between Possession and Intent to Manufacture or Deliver

When a person is charged with possession of a controlled substance and there is a significant amount of the drug, that person may be charged with possession with intent to manufacture or deliver. This is a more serious charge than mere possession and comes with additional consequences.

Penalties for possession with intent to manufacture or deliver can include:

  • Up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000 for possession of methamphetamine or a Schedule I or Schedule II controlled substance that is a narcotic drug;
  • Up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000 for Schedule I, II, or III controlled substances not included in the above category;
  • Up to 2 years in prison and a fine of up to $2,500 for a Schedule IV controlled substance; and
  • Up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $1,000 for a Schedule V drug.

There are also similar penalties for possession with intent to deliver a counterfeit substance.

Consequences Beyond Your Wyoming Drug Possession Sentence

In addition to possession of a controlled substance misdemeanor or a felony offense for drug possession and the resulting sentence, there are additional consequences that you may not be considering. 

For example, if you are convicted of a crime, that conviction will remain part of your criminal record. You will need to disclose that information when you apply for numerous types of jobs and when you seek approval for a home or apartment rental.

In some instances where you are seeking credit, such as student loans, you can be denied credit because of a criminal record. 

In other words, the consequences of a drug possession conviction go far beyond the immediate terms of the sentence. 

You can also be denied the right to own a firearm in certain cases where you have been convicted of a felony offense.

You May Be Able to Lessen the Consequences of Your Wyoming Possession Charge

With the help of an experienced Wyoming criminal defense lawyer, you may be able to have your charges reduced or enter into a diversionary program to avoid having a criminal record. 

It is important to speak with a Wyoming drug possession defense lawyer about the potential consequences of a drug possession conviction and to learn about ways to mitigate the consequences. 

A criminal defense attorney at our firm can speak with you today. Contact Cowboy Country Criminal Defense today to get started on your case with an aggressive Wyoming drug possession defense lawyer.

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